Battery Maritime Building

Once a bustling transportation hub, the 1909 Battery Maritime Building now sits quietly tucked along the water's edge on the southernmost tip of Manhattan. But even though it is dwarfed by the countless skyscrapers that surround it today, the city Economic Development Corporation (EDC) sees its potential.

With a $60 million exterior and structural rehabilitation complete, the EDC now has developers from the Dermot Company working to maximize the potential of this extraordinary landmark building. The company, along with the Poulakakos family, is planning a massive interior renovation, marking the start of a new chapter for this historic downtown site.
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Parabellum picture
@ 2008-05-30 09:53:33
THE symphony of Manhattan Island, composed and performed fortissimo daily by garbage trucks, car speakers, I-beam bolters, bus brakes, warped manhole covers, knocking radiators, people yelling from high windows and the blaring television that now greets you in the back of a taxi, is the kind of music people would pay good money to be able to silence, if only there were a switch.

The other day, in a paint-peeling hangar of a room at the foot of the island, David Byrne, the artist and musician, placed his finger on a switch that did exactly the opposite: it made such music on purpose. The switch was a white key on the bass end of a beat-up Weaver pump organ that was practically the only thing sitting inside the old Great Hall of the Battery Maritime Building, a 99-year-old former ferry terminal at the end of Whitehall Street that has sat mostly dormant for more than a half-century.

http://www.nytimes.com/2008/05/30/arts/music/30byrn.html