'Bob Hope Square' / Hollywood & Vine

Hollywood and Vine, the intersection of Hollywood Boulevard and Vine Street in Hollywood, Los Angeles, California, became famous in the 1920s for its concentration of radio and movie-related businesses. The Hollywood Walk of Fame is centered on the intersection.

The largest collection of photos of Hollywood Blvd. & Vine St. is on the Bruce Torrence Hollywood Historical Collection.

Today, not many production facilities are located in the immediate area. One of the few remaining is the Capitol Records Tower to the north of the intersection; indeed, Capitol Records named its official website "hollywoodandvine.com".
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Anonymous
@ 2016-04-10 01:50:03
Q: Why is the intersection of Hollywood and Vine famous? There’s nothing there.

A: In May of 1936, Wendell Niles from radio station KFWB brought a microphone to the corner and started a man-on-the-street program. “Niles was a big announcer on radio shows for Bob Hope and George Burns,” says L.A. vocal legend Gary Owens. Niles’s popularization of the corner as shorthand for Hollywood was copied by newspaper reporters and gossip columnists alike and even led to the (terrible) feature film Hollywood and Vine, which was released in 1945. The radio show is gone, but you can still watch celebrities through the glass at the online entertainment network BiteSize TV, whose studios are located in the W Hotel.