Dry Falls ice age flood site

"Ten times the size of Niagara, Dry Falls is thought to be the greatest known waterfall that ever existed. According to the current geological model, catastrophic flooding channeled water at 65 miles per hour through the Upper Grand Coulee and over this 400-foot (120 m) rock face at the end of the last ice age. At this time, it is estimated that the flow of the falls was ten times the current flow of all the rivers in the world combined."
182 views
Views by date
UnratedRate as 1Rate as 2Rate as 3Rate as 4Rate as 5Rate as 6Rate as 7Rate as 8Rate as 9Rate as 10

Comments

Policies

Please log in if you don't want to post anonymously (anonymous users cannot post links)

Please enable images and enter code to post
Reload
Share:

Comments

Policies

Please log in if you don't want to post anonymously (anonymous users cannot post links)

Please enable images and enter code to post
Reload
Anonymous picture
Anonymous
@ 2016-06-27 08:54:41
Thinking about the creation of this amazing landmark is so 19th Century, it's depressing! There was NO such thing as an "Ice" Age--if there had been, Siberia WOULD have been glaciated. Similarly, since BOTH the Amazon rain forest, and sub-tropical India SHOW signs of glaciation, Africa WOULD have been glaciated. Instead, what happened, the Earth's axis was relocated, as many as SEVEN (7) times! We KNOW this to be true, because we have pottery shards that reflect DIFFERENT magnetic orientations than the one that exists, today! When wet clay is fired, and is transformed into ceramic, it ADOPTS the magnetic signature of the Earth, allowing the Kiln to be rebuilt, if the placement of the pottery inside is known, OR the pottery itself, if the kiln's location is known. IF the various sciences would TALK among themselves, and discuss findings, we could DISPENSE with nonsense like Ice Ages, invented to EXPLAIN the unexplainable existence of glaciation in places that DON'T get COLD enough, or are not at sufficient altitude to cause glaciation. Also, WHEN Alaskan gold-dredging operations were begun, in the early years of the 20th Century, the bones of TENS OF THOUSANDS of animals were discovered, clogging the dredges, INCLUDING many animals NOT native to Alaska, in "modern" (AD and after) times, like the hippopotamus. Ironically, the hippo does NOT travel more than 30 miles from its place of birth, so explaining WHY there would be ANY such skeletons in FRIGID Alaska was ignored. National Geographic used to publish a poster, with the photos of about 100 such animals, found in the canyons of Alaskan rivers and bays, but NOT native to the location! However, IF one supposes the examples of glaciation WERE tied to PHYSICAL causes, such as the relocation of the poles, then, the existence of warm-climate animals is no longer a problem. Similarly, in Siberia, in 1905, hunters found a perfect specimen of a mammoth. They sliced off steaks, for their sled dogs, and after seeing the dogs suffered NO ill effects, sliced off some for themselves. The animal was FOUND to have FOOD, unchewed in its mouth, and UNDIGESTED, in it stomach! The ONLY way that could have happened was for it to have been "flash frozen", but since Birdseye wouldn't develop his frozen food line for another 30+ years, that's not likely! No, the animal was standing in a field, munching on lunch, when something rocked the Earth, and several degrees were lost, or gained, it its tilt. It says so, in the BIble, "The ten degrees that were taken, from the clock of Ahaz, will be returned on the day of his funeral" SInce Ahaz did NOT have any MECHANICAL clocks, this leaves water clocks and sun dials. HOW do you "move" the "hand" on a sun dial? Alter the aspect between the Sun and the Earth--change the tilt, the distance, or the length of the revolution. The easiest is the angle, or tilt.
Anonymous picture
Anonymous
@ 2016-06-27 08:56:55
Dry Falls represents the OLD water course of the Columbia River, relocated when the uplift of the Sierra Nevada, and lava flow, made this route impassable--probably by blocking the outlet at the southern end.