Crickhowell Castle

Crickhowell Castle


Crickhowell, United Kingdom (GB)
Crickhowell Castle, also known as Alisby's Castle in the small market town of Crickhowell and is located in a small park with playground. The site gives good views of the Usk River valley.

Crickhowell Castle was built by the Normans and thought to have begun in 1121. It is thought that it begun as a motte and bailey castle with timber buildings by Robert Turberville of the family of Norman Lords, then in 1272 it was rebuilt in stone by Sir Grimbald Pauncefote.

During the 14th Century the castle was in the hands of Mortimer, family dynasty of Marcher Lords but in 1402 it was restored to Sir John Pauncefote, great-grandson of Sir Grimbald, who refortified it by royal command of King Henry IV. Even with this refortification the castle was unable to resist Owain Glyndwr's forces who left it in ruins. Later in the century it was granted to Sir William Herbert, who became the Earl of Pembroke. It is unlikely that any further work was done after it was left in runes and the keep was uninhabitable by the mid-16th Century.

Today only a portion of a double tower remain along with other smaller remnants.
Crickhowell Castle, also known as Alisby's Castle in the small market town of Crickhowell and is located in a small park with playground. The site gives good views of the Usk River valley.

Crickhowell Castle was built by the Normans and thought to have begun in 1121. It is thought that it begun as a motte and bailey castle with timber buildings by Robert Turberville of the family of Norman Lords, then in 1272 it was rebuilt in stone by Sir Grimbald Pauncefote.

During the 14th Century the castle was in the hands of Mortimer, family dynasty of Marcher Lords but in 1402 it was restored to Sir John Pauncefote, great-grandson of Sir Grimbald, who refortified it by royal command of King Henry IV. Even with this refortification the castle was unable to resist Owain Glyndwr's forces who left it in ruins. Later in the century it was granted to Sir William Herbert, who became the Earl of Pembroke. It is unlikely that any further work was done after it was left in runes and the keep was uninhabitable by the mid-16th Century.

Today only a portion of a double tower remain along with other smaller remnants.
View in Google Earth Buildings - Castles
Links: www.castlewales.com
By: kuressaare

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