Avro Arrow engine test site

Avro Arrow engine test site


Nobel, Canada (CA)
The Avro Canada CF-105 Arrow was a delta-wing interceptor aircraft, designed and built by Avro Aircraft Limited (Canada) in Malton, Ontario, Canada, as the culmination of a design study that began in 1953. Considered to be both an advanced technical and aerodynamic achievement for the Canadian aviation industry, the CF-105 held the promise of Mach 2 speeds at 50,000 ft+ altitude, and was intended to serve as the Royal Canadian Air Force's interceptor for the 1960s and beyond.

Following the start of its flight test program in 1958, the Arrow, and its accompanying Orenda Iroquois jet engine program, were abruptly cancelled in 1959, sparking a long and bitter political debate. The Arrow is still the subject of controversy, almost 50 years after it was cancelled.
The Avro Canada CF-105 Arrow was a delta-wing interceptor aircraft, designed and built by Avro Aircraft Limited (Canada) in Malton, Ontario, Canada, as the culmination of a design study that began in 1953. Considered to be both an advanced technical and aerodynamic achievement for the Canadian aviation industry, the CF-105 held the promise of Mach 2 speeds at 50,000 ft+ altitude, and was intended to serve as the Royal Canadian Air Force's interceptor for the 1960s and beyond.

Following the start of its flight test program in 1958, the Arrow, and its accompanying Orenda Iroquois jet engine program, were abruptly cancelled in 1959, sparking a long and bitter political debate. The Arrow is still the subject of controversy, almost 50 years after it was cancelled.
View in Google Earth Military - R&D
Links: en.wikipedia.org
By: kjfitz

Advertisement

Around the World Mailing List

Comments

Policies
Please enable images and enter code to post
Reload
Anonymous picture
Anonymous
@ 2017-11-26 18:06:38
in the past I know I saw at least two arrow (Orenda) engines in a building in or near Noble Ontario.Where are they now? their decommisioning was a simply a 2 inch hole in the exhaust area where I curiously pushed the visible turbine blade below, it continued turning easily for at least 5 minutes. I could see that it could easily be restored (the 2 inch holes) and there are 2 engines but now I canot find the building and what happened to the engines. this was about 20 plus a bit years ago,

Advertisement