Walton-on-the-Naze Pier

Walton-on-the-Naze Pier


Walton-on-the-Naze, United Kingdom (GB)
Walton-on-the Naze is situated on the East Coast of Britain close to the better known resort of Clacton. The original pier of 1830 can boast to being one of the earliest such structures in the country. This 300ft (91m) wooden jetty, used solely for the landing of goods and passengers, was to survive some sixty years before being severely damaged in a storm. Walton-on-the-Naze along with other East Anglian resorts had become a popular destination for passengers travelling on the 'Belle' steamers running between London to Great Yarmouth.

The Walton-on-the-Naze Hotel and Pier Company, who owned the now badly Walton-on-the-Naze Pier, rightly decided that a replacement should be built and a design by J Cochrane was accepted. The new 800ft (244m) Walton-on-the-Naze Pier opened in 1895. Successive extensions due to shoreline changes have increased the pier's overall length to 2,600ft (793m), making it the third longest pier in the country.

Along with other piers of considerable length it was important to move passengers and their luggage to the pier-head as comfortably and efficiently as technology would allow, especially in inclement weather. To this end a single-track electric tramway was installed along the pier deck. This tramway survived until 1935 when it was replaced by a rather unusual battery-powered carriage. Damaged in the fire of 1942 the battery carriage was eventually superseded by a diesel locomotive in 1948. Sadly, the railway service ceased operation in the 1970s. Along with other piers on the East Coast, storms in 1978-1979 were to cause considerable damage. At Walton-on-the-Naze massive waves battered the structure until eventually a 108ft (33m) section of the pier neck, collapsed into the sea.

Today, still owned by New Walton Pier Company who purchased it in 1937, Walton-on-the-Naze Pier plays host to a plethora of modern amusements and facilities that are all housed in an aircraft-hanger like building, at the shoreward end. Passing through the amusements the pier opens out into an uncluttered promenade, stretching as it did in its heyday towards the pier-head. Once here, Walton-on-the-Naze Pier becomes a favoured haunt of anglers. Walton-on-the-Naze Pier, like its neighbour at Clacton, may not be for the traditionalist, lacking the elegance and charm of a Victorian classic, but it still retains considerable entertainment appeal for the British tripper and, in the end, that is exactly what it was originally intended to do.
Walton-on-the Naze is situated on the East Coast of Britain close to the better known resort of Clacton. The original pier of 1830 can boast to being one of the earliest such structures in the country. This 300ft (91m) wooden jetty, used solely for the landing of goods and passengers, was to survive some sixty years before being severely damaged in a storm. Walton-on-the-Naze along with other East Anglian resorts had become a popular destination for passengers travelling on the 'Belle' steamers running between London to Great Yarmouth.

The Walton-on-the-Naze Hotel and Pier Company, who owned the now badly Walton-on-the-Naze Pier, rightly decided that a replacement should be built and a design by J Cochrane was accepted. The new 800ft (244m) Walton-on-the-Naze Pier opened in 1895. Successive extensions due to shoreline changes have increased the pier's overall length to 2,600ft (793m), making it the third longest pier in the country.

Along with other piers of considerable length it was important to move passengers and their luggage to the pier-head as comfortably and efficiently as technology would allow, especially in inclement weather. To this end a single-track electric tramway was installed along the pier deck. This tramway survived until 1935 when it was replaced by a rather unusual battery-powered carriage. Damaged in the fire of 1942 the battery carriage was eventually superseded by a diesel locomotive in 1948. Sadly, the railway service ceased operation in the 1970s. Along with other piers on the East Coast, storms in 1978-1979 were to cause considerable damage. At Walton-on-the-Naze massive waves battered the structure until eventually a 108ft (33m) section of the pier neck, collapsed into the sea.

Today, still owned by New Walton Pier Company who purchased it in 1937, Walton-on-the-Naze Pier plays host to a plethora of modern amusements and facilities that are all housed in an aircraft-hanger like building, at the shoreward end. Passing through the amusements the pier opens out into an uncluttered promenade, stretching as it did in its heyday towards the pier-head. Once here, Walton-on-the-Naze Pier becomes a favoured haunt of anglers. Walton-on-the-Naze Pier, like its neighbour at Clacton, may not be for the traditionalist, lacking the elegance and charm of a Victorian classic, but it still retains considerable entertainment appeal for the British tripper and, in the end, that is exactly what it was originally intended to do.
View in Google Earth Piers
Links: www.theheritagetrail.co.uk
By: kjfitz

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