Ruins of St Radigund's Abbey

Ruins of St Radigund's Abbey


Dover, United Kingdom (GB)
The ruins of St Radigund's Abbey lie to the southwest of the London Road, the name of the founder of the Abbey is uncertain, but it dates back to about the year 1190 and was founded for the canons of the Praemonstratensian Order. It was visited by Edward II. in the thirteenth year of his reign (1319) but according to an old manuscript it had come into a very ruinous condition by the year 1500 owing to " the abbot having wasted the income of his house on licentious pleasures."

The ruins cover a large area of ground which indicates that the precincts were extensive. It seems to have been surrounded by a broad ditch and rampart. A historian of a century ago thus describes it : " The walls of the entrance-gateway, which are of great thickness and strength, are still nearly entire ; this gateway opens by a large arch in the centre, and has a smaller arch adjoining for foot-passengers. The north and west sides of the chapel, with part of the dwelling, now patched up as a farmhouse, are also standing ; the latter had a projecting porch in the centre, but this now forms the end of the building. That part of the front which adjoins it is curiously checkered with flint and stones, but the chief portion of the ruins is built of flint inter­mingled with chalk, with freestone cornerstones."
The ruins of St Radigund's Abbey lie to the southwest of the London Road, the name of the founder of the Abbey is uncertain, but it dates back to about the year 1190 and was founded for the canons of the Praemonstratensian Order. It was visited by Edward II. in the thirteenth year of his reign (1319) but according to an old manuscript it had come into a very ruinous condition by the year 1500 owing to " the abbot having wasted the income of his house on licentious pleasures."

The ruins cover a large area of ground which indicates that the precincts were extensive. It seems to have been surrounded by a broad ditch and rampart. A historian of a century ago thus describes it : " The walls of the entrance-gateway, which are of great thickness and strength, are still nearly entire ; this gateway opens by a large arch in the centre, and has a smaller arch adjoining for foot-passengers. The north and west sides of the chapel, with part of the dwelling, now patched up as a farmhouse, are also standing ; the latter had a projecting porch in the centre, but this now forms the end of the building. That part of the front which adjoins it is curiously checkered with flint and stones, but the chief portion of the ruins is built of flint inter­mingled with chalk, with freestone cornerstones."
View in Google Earth Abandoned, Religious - Christianity
Links: www.doverpages.co.uk
By: kjfitz

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