Trestle Electromagnetic Pulse Simulator

Trestle Electromagnetic Pulse Simulator
Trestle Electromagnetic Pulse Simulator
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By photog @ 2005-05-12 21:11:31
Kirtland Air Force Base.

The facility is the largest wood-and-glue laminated structure in the world. Aircraft tested here are subjected to up to 10 million volts of electricity to simulate the effects of a nuclear explosion and assess the "hardness" of electrical and electronic equipment to the EMP pulse generated by a nuclear burst.
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robsv picture
@ 2005-07-14 10:27:51
This structure is not an antenna array, it's an electromagnetic pulse (EMP) simulator. The white platform is a wooden trestle that vehicles (or other test subjects) are positioned on, then zapped with up to 10 million volts of electricity to determine the "hardness" of electronic components to the EMP resulting from a nuclear burst. The trestle is the largest wood and glue laminated structure in the world - no metal was used - no screws or nails, just wooden pegs.
Anonymous picture
Anonymous
@ 2005-07-30 13:00:59
The square platform is large enough to park a B-52 or 747.